Apriso side effects: What you need to know

Here are a few quick facts about Apriso:

  • Drug form: extended-release oral capsules that are taken by mouth
  • Drug class: aminosalicylates
  • Active ingredient: mesalamine

Apriso, like all medications, has the potential to cause negative effects. Continue reading to learn about the potential for common, mild, and severe adverse effects.

Overview

doctor and patient

Apriso is a prescription medicine with a brand name. The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) has given it approval to keep ulcerative colitis (UC) in adults in remission.

Swelling or ulcers in the large intestine are symptoms of UC. You don’t have any UC symptoms when you’re in remission. If Apriso helps your UC, your doctor will probably recommend that you continue taking it indefinitely.

Side effects of Apriso

Apriso can cause a variety of adverse effects, with some being more prevalent than others. These negative effects may only last a few days or weeks. However, if the adverse effects persist, disturb you, or become severe, you should consult your doctor or pharmacist.

These are some of the more prevalent negative effects reported by Apriso people in clinical trials:

  • pain in the upper abdomen
  • nausea
  • common cold
  • Side effects of Apriso
  • headache*
  • diarrhea*

Mild side effects of Apriso

Apriso usage can cause minor negative effects. This list may not cover all of the drug’s minor adverse effects. Apriso’s prescribing information should be consulted for more information.

Apriso has been linked to the following mild side effects:

  • common cold
  • hair loss*
  • headache*
  • diarrhea*
  • pain in the upper abdomen
  • nausea

These negative effects may only last a few days or weeks. However, if the adverse effects persist, disturb you, or become severe, you should consult your doctor or pharmacist.

Note: After the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) approves a drug, the agency monitors and assesses its side effects. Visit MedWatch if you experience an adverse effect while taking Apriso and wish to report it to the FDA.

Serious side effects of Apriso

Apriso has the potential to cause major adverse effects. Apriso, on the other hand, has a low risk of major adverse effects.

The list below may not represent all of the drug’s significant side effects. Apriso’s prescribing information should be consulted for more information.

Call your doctor straight away if you experience major adverse effects while taking Apriso. If you think you’re having a medical emergency or the side effects seem life-threatening, call 911 or your local emergency number right once.

The following are serious side effects and their symptoms that have been reported:

  • Kidney problems, including kidney stones. Symptoms can include:
    • decreased urination
    • nausea or vomiting
    • fatigue (lack of energy)
  • Liver problems. Symptoms can include:
  • Mesalamine-induced acute intolerance syndrome.*
  • Severe skin reactions, including Stevens-Johnson syndrome and toxic epidermal necrolysis. Symptoms can include:
    • skin rash that may blister or peel
    • body aches
    • cough
    • fever
  • Allergic reaction.*

FAQs about the side effects of Apriso

Apriso has a number of potential adverse effects. Here are some of the most common queries about the drug’s adverse effects.

Do Apriso’s side effects include weight gain?

No, Apriso should not cause you to gain weight. Apriso’s clinical trials found no evidence of weight increase.

However, if Apriso is working for you and maintaining your ulcerative colitis (UC) symptoms in remission, you may gain weight. (You don’t have UC symptoms when you’re in remission.)

You may not be able to consume or absorb nutrients from meals as well as you can when you have active UC. You may be able to eat more food if you achieve remission with Apriso, which could cause to weight gain.

Other ulcerative colitis treatments, such as steroid drugs, especially prednisone, might cause weight gain. These medicines may be used to relieve UC symptoms during a flare, however they also cause weight gain.

Consult your doctor if you’re gaining weight while taking Apriso. They may be able to assist you in determining the source of your weight gain.

Can Apriso cause long-term side effects?

Apriso has the potential to cause long-term adverse effects. The majority of Apriso’s side effects, on the other hand, are minor and short-lived.

Kidney or liver disorders are examples of long-term adverse effects that may arise.

Your doctor will keep an eye on you for signs of adverse effects while you’re taking Apriso. Tell your doctor if you have any side effects. If you experience any serious or potentially long-term side effects, your doctor may suggest switching to a different drug.

Are there any side effects of stopping Apriso?

Not at all. If you stop taking Apriso, though, your UC symptoms may return. Apriso works by assisting you in keeping your UC in remission. UC symptoms may reappear if you stop taking the medicine.

UC can cause a variety of symptoms, including:

  • fatigue (lack of energy)
  • rectal bleeding
  • diarrhea
  • abdominal pain or cramps

Talk to your doctor about other UC treatment choices if you need to stop taking Apriso. It’s possible that your doctor will advise you to take a different prescription. Alternatively, they may suggest ways to keep your UC symptoms from reappearing after you stop taking Apriso.

Side effect specifics

Learn about some of the potential adverse effects of Apriso.

Headache

While taking Apriso, you may have headaches. The most prevalent side effect recorded in clinical trials of this drug was headaches.

What you can do

Consult your doctor if you’re experiencing headaches while taking Apriso.

Your doctor may advise you on how to reduce the frequency of your headaches. They may prescribe acetaminophen (Tylenol) or other over-the-counter pain medications in some circumstances.

If your headaches are severe or occur frequently, make an appointment with your doctor. In this scenario, your doctor may advise you to take a different prescription than Apriso.

Hair loss

Hair loss is possible when using Apriso, however it is uncommon. In clinical trials, some people who took this medicine experienced hair loss as a side effect.

Keep in mind that vitamin deficiency could also be a cause in hair loss. Apriso is used to treat ulcerative colitis (UC), which causes some people to have difficulties absorbing nutrients from their food. Furthermore, some vitamins and minerals are required for the maintenance of healthy skin and hair.

What you can do

Consult your doctor if you’re experiencing hair loss while taking Apriso. Other options for reducing hair loss may be suggested.

Checking for vitamin deficits with your doctor is a good idea. Your doctor may advise you on how to deal with nutrient shortages so that you can stop losing hair.

Mesalamine-induced acute intolerance syndrome

A rare adverse effect known as mesalamine-induced acute intolerance syndrome has emerged in some people. When you take mesalamine (the active ingredient in Apriso) or sulfasalazine (a medicine that is converted to mesalamine once inside the body), you may have this dangerous side effect.

It’s unclear how frequently Apriso users develop mesalamine-induced acute intolerance syndrome.

The symptoms of this illness were strikingly similar to those of an ulcerative colitis (UC) flare. It’s also worth noting that Apriso is used to treat UC.

The following are some of the symptoms of this syndrome:

  • fever
  • headache
  • rash
  • stomach cramps or abdominal pain
  • bloody diarrhea

What you can do

Tell your doctor if you experience symptoms of mesalamine-induced acute intolerance syndrome. They’ll assist you in determining the source of your symptoms.

Your doctor will most likely advise you to discontinue taking Apriso if you develop this symptom.

Diarrhea

You may get diarrhea when using Apriso. During clinical trials, diarrhoea was one of the most common side effects in people taking Apriso.

Remember that diarrhea is a common sign of ulcerative colitis (UC), which Apriso treats.

Bloody diarrhea, on the other hand, could indicate mesalamine-induced acute intolerance syndrome. For further information on this syndrome, see the section just above.

What you can do

Consult your doctor if you get diarrhea after taking Apriso.

Diarrhea can be a sign of UC in some cases. Apriso can sometimes cause diarrhea as a side effect. Your doctor can assist you in determining the source of your diarrhea. They can also advise on the best course of action.

Reaction to allergens

Apriso, like most medications, might cause adverse reactions in some people.

Symptoms of an allergic reaction can range from mild to severe, and include:

  • swelling under your skin, typically in your lips, eyelids, feet, or hands
  • rash
  • swelling of your mouth, tongue, or throat, which can make it hard to breathe
  • itching
  • flushing (temporary warmth, redness, or deepening of skin color)

Apriso allergy reactions can be severe in some situations, causing inflammation in your:

  • lungs
  • liver
  • heart
  • kidneys

Apriso should not be taken if you have ever had an adverse reaction to salicylate medicines like aspirin. Because Apriso is related to salicylate medicines, this is the case.

What you can do

Call your doctor right away if you experience mild symptoms of an allergic reaction. They may suggest strategies to alleviate your symptoms and advise you on whether or not to continue taking Apriso.

However, if you are experiencing severe signs of an allergic reaction and believe you are experiencing a medical emergency, call 911 or your local emergency number right once.

Apriso Safety Precautions

Before you start taking Apriso, talk to your doctor about your medical history. If you have certain medical disorders or other variables that affect your health, this medicine may not be the best treatment for you. The following are some of the conditions and factors to consider:

Problems with the liver. If you have liver disease, apriso can raise your chance of liver failure. While taking this medication, your doctor may advise you to get your liver checked more frequently than normal. Alternatively, they could prescribe a different drug to address your condition.

Problems with the kidneys. Before you start taking Apriso, tell your doctor if you have any kidney problems. Kidney issues, especially kidney stones, may cause as a result of this medicine. Apriso can exacerbate kidney problems if you already have them. While taking Apriso, your doctor may check your kidneys more frequently than normal. Alternatively, they may prescribe a different drug for you.

An allergic reaction has occurred. Apriso should not be taken. If you’ve ever been allergic to Apriso or any of its constituents, don’t use it. Apriso is related to aspirin and other salicylate-based medicines. If you have any allergies, including to salicylates, be careful to tell your doctor. Apriso’s safety can be determined by your doctor. Consult your doctor to see if there are any other treatments that may be a better fit for you.

Certain skin problems. Apriso may increase your risk of sunburn if you have certain skin diseases, such as eczema. Sunburn can be dangerous in some instances. Your doctor will most likely advise you to stay out of the sun. They may also advise you to wear skin-protecting apparel and use sunscreen when you’re outside.

Phenylketonuria. Before taking Apriso, tell your doctor if you have phenylketonuria. (Phenylketonuria is a hereditary condition in which the protein phenylalanine causes in the body.) Phenylalanine is found in apricots. If you obtain phenylalanine from other sources as well, it could build up in your system. Seizures and other major adverse effects are possible. Your doctor may want to check on you more frequently than normal. If you have phenylketonuria, they may prescribe a different prescription for you.

Problems with the heart. Before starting Apriso, tell your doctor if you have any heart issues. Apriso can cause myocarditis (heart swelling) or pericarditis (heart inflammation) (swelling of the lining of your heart). Apriso can aggravate your heart condition if you already have one. While using Apriso, your doctor may monitor your heart health or prescribe a different drug for you.

People who are 65 years old or older. Apriso may have a different effect on older persons (65 years and older) than it does on younger adults. Apriso has been linked to an increased risk of blood problems in older people. Neutropenia (a low amount of neutrophils, a type of white blood cell) and agranulocytosis are two instances of these blood disorders (very low level of neutrophils). As a result of this danger, your doctor may want to check your blood frequently while you’re on Apriso.

Alcohol use with Apriso

Apriso hasn’t been linked to any alcohol interactions. However, the effects of alcohol and Apriso are remarkably similar. Both alcohol and Apriso, for example, can cause:

  • liver problems
  • nausea
  • headache

If you drink alcohol while taking Apriso, you may have more of these negative effects.

If you’d like, talk to your doctor about whether you can drink a certain amount of alcohol while taking Apriso.

Apriso during pregnancy and breastfeeding

Read on to learn more about Apriso during pregnancy and breastfeeding.

Pregnancy and Apriso

Apriso isn’t known to be safe to consume during pregnancy.

Apriso did not appear to harm growing fetuses in animal experiments. Animal studies, on the other hand, do not necessarily predict what would happen in humans.

Additionally, untreated ulcerative colitis (UC) can affect a developing fetus. Keep in mind that Apriso is prescribed for the treatment of UC.

Consult your doctor before taking Apriso if you are pregnant or trying to become pregnant.

Breastfeeding and Apriso

Apriso is not known to be safe to consume when nursing. The medication does, however, enter into human breast milk. As a result, a breastfed infant would be exposed.

The medicine has the potential to cause diarrhea in a breastfed infant. However, it is unknown what other side effects the medicine may have.

Consult your doctor before taking Apriso if you’re breastfeeding.

When should you consult your doctor?

Apriso has the potential to cause adverse effects. The majority of the time, these side effects are minor. However, some people may develop major adverse effects in rare cases.

Talk to your doctor or pharmacist if you want to learn more about Apriso. They can assist you with any queries you may have concerning the drug’s negative effects.

You might want to perform some independent research on this medicine in addition to speaking with your doctor.

Disclaimer: NccMed has gone too hard to ensure that all information is factually correct, complete, and accurate. This page, however, should not be used as a substitute for a licensed healthcare professional’s knowledge and competence. Before taking any drug, you should always consult your doctor or another healthcare expert. The material on this page on drugs is subject to change, and it is not meant to cover all possible uses, directions, precautions, warnings, drug interactions, allergic reactions, or side effects. The absence of warnings or other information for a medicine or drug combination does not imply that the drug or drug combination is safe, effective, or appropriate for all patients or all specified applications.

Sources:

  • https://shared.salix.com/globalassets/pi/Apriso-PI.pdf
  • https://www.medicalnewstoday.com/articles/drugs-apriso-side-effects