How Many Xanax Can You Bring Back From Mexico 2022

Xanax

Alprazolam, also known as Xanax and Farmapram, is a short-acting tranquilizer of the triazolobenzodiazepine class, which consists of benzodiazepines fused with a triazole ring. It is most typically used to treat anxiety disorders, notably panic disorder and generalized anxiety disorder, in the short term.

Xanax (Alprazolam) is made in Mexico by more than one company. The most popular brand of Mexican Xanax bars is Farmapram. The United States has the most expensive prescription drugs in the world, so many Americans buy their drugs from Canadian or Mexican pharmacies to save money.

Xanax

How many Xanax can you bring back from Mexico?

People are permitted to carry FDA-approved prescription drugs back into the United States for personal use, subject to the conditions listed below. People may bring up to 50 dosage units without a prescription in general. A prescription from an FDA-approved U.S. physician is required to bring more than 50 dosage units of Xanax across the border. A prescription from a Mexican physician is no longer valid.

However, a supply lasting more than 60 to 90 days may be prohibited by US Customs authorities. All medications, including Mexican Xanax Bars, must be declared and be in their original containers upon arrival. Drugs that have not been approved by the US Food and Drug Administration may be ineligible for importing. It is illegal to fail to properly declare imported pharmaceuticals to US Customs.

How should I take Mexican Xanax?

Take Mexican Xanax bars exactly as your doctor has instructed. Read all medication recommendations and follow the directions on your prescription label. Your dose may be adjusted on occasion by your doctor. Never take Xanax in bigger doses or for longer than recommended. Inform your doctor if you have an increased desire to use this medication.

Never give this medication to anybody else, especially someone who has a history of drug abuse or addiction. ADDICTION, OVERDOSE, OR DEATH CAN RESULT FROM MISUSE. Keep the medication in a location where others cannot access it. It is illegal to sell or distribute this medication.

Xanax is typically prescribed for no more than four months to treat anxiety disorders and for no more than ten weeks to treat panic disorders. Pay close attention to your doctor’s dosing instructions. If your symptoms do not improve or worsen, contact your doctor. If you use this medication for an extended period of time, you may require frequent medical examinations.

If you stop using Mexican Xanax abruptly, you may have unpleasant withdrawal symptoms. Follow your doctor’s recommendations for tapering your dose.

Misuse of Mexican Xanax

People frequently abuse Xanax for the quick-acting, relaxed “high” it can produce. The number of patients seeking treatment for benzodiazepine abuse nearly tripled between 1998 and 2008, according to the Treatment Episode Data Set. Long-term Xanax abuse and addiction are linked to depression, psychotic episodes, and violent or impulsive conduct.

According to the Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration, nearly 1.2 million ER visits in 2011 were connected to the nonmedical use of prescription medicines. Xanax was used in around 10% of such visits. Xanax-related ER visits more than quadrupled from 57,419 to 124,902 between 2005 and 2010, and stayed constant at 123,744 in 2011.

The most common drug combinations encountered by healthcare workers in persons coming to the ER were Xanax and alcohol, as well as Xanax and prescription opiates such as hydrocodone (Zohydro ER) and oxycodone (OxyContin).

What if I forget to take a dose?

Take the medication as soon as possible, but skip the missed dose if your next dose is approaching. Take no more than one dose at a time.

What happens if I take too much Mexican Xanax?

Seek emergency medical treatment or dial 1-800-222-1222 for Poison Help. An alprazolam overdose can be lethal. Excessive sleepiness, confusion, muscle weakness, loss of balance or coordination, feeling light-headed, and fainting are all possible overdose symptoms.

What to stay away from

Avoid consuming alcohol. Dangerous adverse effects including death are possible. Avoid driving or engaging in risky activities until you know how this medication may effect you. Dizziness and drowsiness can lead to falls, accidents, and serious injury. Grapefruit may also interact with alprazolam, resulting in undesirable side effects. Grapefruit products should be avoided.

Side effects of Mexican Xanax

If you experience hives, difficulty breathing, or swelling of your face, lips, tongue, or neck, seek emergency medical attention.

Alprazolam can cause your breathing to slow or stop, especially if you have recently used an opioid medicine, alcohol, or other medications that cause your breathing to slow. If you have weak or shallow breathing, are difficult to wake up, or stop breathing, someone caring for you should seek immediate medical treatment.

If you develop any of the following symptoms, contact your doctor right away:

  • weak or shallow breathing;
  • a light-headed feeling, like you might pass out;
  • a seizure;
  • hallucinations, risk-taking behavior;
  • increased energy, decreased need for sleep;
  • racing thoughts, being agitated or talkative;
  • double vision; or
  • jaundice (yellowing of the skin or eyes)

Alprazolam’s sedative effects may last longer in older adults. Falls are common in elderly individuals on benzodiazepines. Use caution to avoid falling or being injured by accident.

Typical Xanax side effects include:

  • drowsiness; or
  • feeling light-headed

This is not a complete list of possible side effects; more may arise. For medical advice on side effects, contact your doctor.

What other medicines interact with Xanax?

It is not always safe to take multiple drugs at the same time. Some drugs can impact the blood levels of other medications you are taking, potentially increasing side effects or making the medications less effective.

Taking Xanax alongside other medicines that produce sleepiness or slow breathing can result in serious adverse effects or death. Before using an opioid, sleeping pill, muscle relaxer, prescription cough medicine, or drug for depression or seizures, consult your doctor.

About the author

Chukwuebuka Martins

Chukwuebuka Martins is a writer, researcher, and health enthusiast who specializes in human physiology. He takes great pleasure in penning informative articles on many aspects of physical wellness, which he then thoroughly enjoys sharing to the general public.

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