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Lung supplements: What to know

Coughing, shortness of breath, wheezing, coughing up mucus or blood, and chest pain are all people of lung problems. Some companies claim that their vitamins and supplements can help boost lung health. However, medical evidence is still needed to back up these claims. Coughing, shortness of breath, wheezing, coughing up mucus or blood, and chest pain are all people of lung problems. Some companies claim that their vitamins and supplements can help boost lung health. However, medical evidence is still needed to back up these claims.

a lady taking pills

This page discusses how supplements may aid the lungs, when this may be beneficial, how to choose, and when to consult a doctor.

About lungs and supplements

Lung health is an important component of the respiratory system. They enable fresh oxygen into the body while also removing waste gases such as carbon dioxide.

According to the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute (NHLBI), a person can keep their lungs healthy by:

  • not smoking
  • maintaining a moderate weight
  • being physically active
  • being mindful of air pollution
  • taking cold and flu precautions

There has been minimal research into how supplements can improve lung health. However, according to one 2017 study, vitamin D aids in the promotion of respiratory health and the prevention of infections.

N-acetylcysteine

According to a 2017 review, clinicians may recommend N-acetylcysteine (NAC) to treat several illnesses caused by unstable atoms.

NAC is a safe and potent antioxidant that can aid with illnesses like asthma and chronic bronchitis when taken as a dietary supplement.

However, more research is needed to determine the entire effects of NAC on the respiratory system.

When should you take lung supplements?

A person suffering from any of the following medical issues may want to consider taking supplementary supplements to improve their lung health:

One study published in 2019 looked at the impact of supplements on the airways of people with asthma who smoked or did not smoke. The author concludes that there were no overall good impacts, and that disease rates increased in several cases.

Supplement security

The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) acknowledges that supplements are not subject to the same level of scrutiny as prescription pharmaceuticals.

The FDA’s participation in supplement safety and efficacy prior to marketing is minimal. It does, however, state that supplement makers must not sell their goods by making health claims. This implies that supplement makers are not allowed to make claims about their product’s ability to cure, treat, prevent, or diagnose sickness.

If a supplement maker creates a product with a new ingredient, they must notify the FDA, who will only assess it for safety. The EPA is still refusing to authorize the supplement or test its efficacy.

How to Make a Decision

Some supplements may help a person by replenishing important vitamins and minerals in the body. However, before using lung supplements, a person should contact with a doctor, especially if they have a verified condition. This is due to the fact that some supplements may interfere with prescription drugs.

The FDA warns that just because a supplement producer claims to have used natural components does not mean the product is safe. As a result, speaking with a doctor about vitamins and supplements may enhance a person’s general health.

When to See a Doctor

If a person has any worries about their breathing or lung health, they should consult a doctor.

Symptoms of a lung condition, according to the American Lung Association, may include:

  • breathing difficulties
  • shortness of breath
  • wheezing
  • difficulty breathing during exercise
  • a continuous cough
  • coughing up blood or mucus
  • chest pain or discomfort

Conclusion

Supplements that replace the body’s natural stores of vitamins, minerals, or other nutrients may aid people with lung issues. Furthermore, they may provide brief relief from cold or flu symptoms.

However, before using supplements, a person should consult with a doctor, especially if they are also taking prescribed medications. Because of the risk of drug interactions, this is the case.

Sources:

  • https://www.mdpi.com/2072-6643/11/4/725/htm
  • https://www.nhlbi.nih.gov/health-topics/how-lungs-work
  • https://www.womenshealth.gov/a-z-topics/lung-disease
  • https://www.medicalnewstoday.com/articles/best-supplements-for-lungs
  • https://www.bmj.com/content/356/bmj.i6583
  • https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5241507/
  • https://www.lung.org/lung-health-diseases/warning-signs-of-lung-disease

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